In the FDA’s effort to make both its decisions and clinical trial data more transparent to the public, Agency decisions have become more available for public debate.  Sophisticated analyses (increasingly by third parties) of publically available data may present to the FDA a more complex picture of drug safety, as not all posted clinical trials fit standard regulatory paradigms, are sufficiently powered, have similar patient selection criteria,  or collect and analyze similar parameters. Changes made in the interest of public health, therefore, may further complicate regulatory assessment of potential changes to drug status.  For these reasons, among others, drug safety decisions are rarely “black and white.”  To its credit, the “new” FDA seems more open to try a middle path (e.g., the diabetes medicine Avandia will remain on the market under a restricted access program [risk evaluation and mitigation strategy, or REMS]).  Even more unusual, however, was public admission by the FDA of disagreement about Avandia within its own scientific ranks.  Furthermore, 3 top FDA officials co-authored a New England Journal of Medicine article explaining their rationale.  Interpretation of clinical trial data, however, is relatively easy compared to analyses of post-market safety data, where patient populations and indications are even more diverse.  It will be interesting to see how public access to evolving data (e.g., the anticipated FDA post-marketing drug safety (public) website) will affect Agency decisions, the timing of those decisions, and how much influence third-party analyses will have on regulatory outcomes.  The upside to the ensuing debate may be heightened public awareness of the importance of risk management, as all drugs have risk.  With the down-spiral of new drugs both coming to and remaining on the market, an outstanding question is whether the public and subsequently the regulatory environment will become more or less risk adverse as our perception of drug safety and risk management evolves.

Source: The New York Times

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Reply